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Honey Production  
The Carob Tree

The carob tree is one of the trees that prospered in our island a long time ago and was as sought after abroad. It is an evergreen tree that is resistant to heat and drought, which contributed to its flourishing on our island. The carob tree bears fruit after the seventh year for 80 to 100 years.

The Carob Brittle & Carob Honey

It is a very nutritious as well as delicious product which contains iron, phosphate, potassium, magnesium, minerals, vitamins A and D, vitamin B complex as well as three times more calcium than milk. It is worth mentioning that it is considered to be one of the most effective 'medicines' against constipation since it 'cleans' the human intestinal tract.

Production of Carob Honey
  1. In a 'pithari' (traditional clay container) containing water we add ground carobs, which must be left to soak in the water.
  2. After they have soaked in the water they are transferred into baskets to give their juice.
  3. The juice is then collected in a large copper cauldron - traditional 'charji' - and afterwards it is being transferred into the boiler.
  4. The juice must boil in the cauldron until the water is vaporized and only the carob honey is left.
  5. After it has cooled, it is bottled to be sold.
Production of Carob Brittle (Pasteli)
  1. In a 'pithari' (traditional clay container) containing water we add ground carobs, which must be left soak the in water.
  2. After they have soaked in the water they are transferred into baskets to give their juice.
  3. The juice is then collected in a large copper cauldron - traditional 'charji' - and afterwards it is being transferred into the boiler.
  4. The juice must boil in the cauldron until the water is vaporized and only the carob honey is left.
  5. The temperature of the cauldron in which the carob honey is boiling is being controlled by the adding or the removal of wood from the fire. As it is being heated it is constantly being stirred until it acquires the appearance of solidified mush, that is, the brittle's first form.
  6. Then it is placed in a vessel until cool.
  7. After it has cooled it gains a more solidified form and then the 'pasteli' is ready to be "pulled".
  8. The "pulling" is a manual method and lasts about half an hour. This process is essential in order for the color of the brittle to become lighter and therefore more appealing.
  9. When the brittle is ready, it is divided into smaller pieces, weighed and packed to be sold.